Book Awards · Book News

Booktrust’s 100 Best Books: 12-14 year olds.

In this final look at the Booktrust’s list of 100 books children should read before they turn 14 the books are aimed at 12 – 14 year olds, the cut off point imposed by Booktrust as “beyond that, children tend to progress to more adult literature”. I may come back to this idea in a later post, but for now will concentrate on the list.

This is the full list, with the books I’ve read made bold.

Watership Down by Richard Adams
NoughtsCrossesNoughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman
Forever by Judy Blume
– The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas by John Boyne
– Junk by Melvin Burgess
Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
MaggotMoonMaggot Moon by Sally Gardner
– The Owl Service by Alan Garner
– Coram Boy by Jamila Gavin
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Stormbreaker by Anthony Horowitz
– The Kite Rider by Geraldine McCaughrean
The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness
– Life: An Exploded Diagram by Mal Peet
Northern Lights by Philip Pullman
The Ruby in the Smoke by Philip Pullman
WitchChild– Witch Child by Celia Rees
Mortal Engines by Philip Reeve
Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging by Louise Rennison
How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff
– Revolver by Marcus Sedgwick
I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith
The Fellowship of the Ring by J R R Tolkien

For this final list I have read 17 out of the 25, similarly to yesterday’s 9-11 years list there are 4 books that have been on my need to read list for some time. There are a couple of books I’ve never heard of, ones I must definitely investigate.

It’s interesting that in comparison to the three other sections of the list this is the one with more modern and recent releases than the other lists. There are only a small handful of books that were already relatively old when I was a child, compared with much bigger portions of previous lists. I read some of the books on this list when I was in the target demographic but have read far more of them since, some due to their publication dates and some because they just weren’t in my awareness.

Like all of the lists there are books I’m surprised to see, and books I’m surprised not to see. I think this is the list I am probably most curious to see the voting results for, once the public have chosen a favourite. I think it’s probably the hardest to predict out of all four lists.

Book Awards · Book News

Booktrust’s 100 Best Books: 9-11 year olds.

In this third post looking at Booktrust’s list of the 100 books children should read before they’re 14 the focus moves to books aimed at 9-11 year olds, a book demographic I particularly enjoy.

Here’s the list in full, books in bold are the ones I’ve read.

The Wolves of Willoughby Chase by Joan Aiken
SkelligSkellig by David Almond
Carrie’s War by Nina Bawden
– Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
– Millions by Frank Cottrell Boyce
The Witches by Roald Dahl and Quentin Blake
Matilda by Roald Dahl and Quentin Blake
Flour Babies by Anne Fine
– Once by Morris Gleizman
The Adventures of Tintin by Hergé
– Journey to the River Sea by Eva Ibbotson
StigStig of the Dump by Clive King
The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe by C S Lewis
Goodnight Mister Tom by Michelle Magorian
– Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo
A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness and Jim Kay
The Borrowers by Mary Norton
TruckersTruckers by Terry Pratchett
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J K Rowling
Holes by Louis Sachar
– The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery
Ballet Shoes by Noel Streatfield
The Hobbit by J R R Tolkien

With 18 out of 25 books read from this list, this is the list I’m most familiar with (just). Of the 7 books I haven’t read 4 have been high on my radar for quite some time – I just haven’t got to them yet. Of the books I have read there are some titles that were real favourites when I was young, 6 or 7 of them would appear on my most re-read books list. I’m very pleased to see some far more recent “classics” appear on the list, and thrilled that last year’s Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medals winner A Monster Calls has a very justified inclusion.

Book Awards · Book News

Booktrust’s 100 Best Books: 6-8 year olds.

Today my attention is shifted to the 25 books aimed at 6-8 year olds that Booktrust have included on their list of 100 books children should read before they’re 14.

Again, here’s the list in full with the books I’ve read in bold type.

EnchantedWoodThe Enchanted Wood by Enid Blyton
Five on a Treasure Island by Enid Blyton
A Bear Called Paddington by Michael Bond and Peggy Fortnum
The Milly-Molly-Mandy Storybook by Joyce Lankester Brisley
Flat Stanley by Jeff Brown and Scott Nash
– Clarice Bean, That’s Me by Lauren Child
– That Rabbit Belongs to Emily Brown by Cressida Cowell and Neal Layton
The BFG by Roald Dahl and Quentin Blake
– The Story of Babar by Jean De Brunhoff
My Naughty Little Sister by Dorothy Edwards and Shirley Hughes
Asterix the Gaul by René Goscinny and Albert Uderzo
AmazingGrace– Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman and Caroline Binch
Finn Family Moomintroll by Tove Jansson (translated by Elizabeth Portch)
The Queen’s Nose by Dick King-Smith
The Sheep-Pig by Dick King-Smith and Mike Terry
– Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren (translated by Tina Nunnally)
Winnie-the-Pooh by A A Milne and E H Shepherd
The Worst Witch by Jill Murphy
– The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith
– Horrid Henry by Francesca Simon and Tony Ross
TheArrivalThe Arrival by Shaun Tan
– Charlotte’s Web by E B White and Garth Williams
– Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
– Mister Magnolia by Quentin Blake

This time I’ve read 15 out of the 25, and of the ones I’ve read virtually all of them were books I read myself as a child – the notable expection being Shaun Tan’s excellent The Arrival which I’ve only recently read. Of the books I have read there are a few that I read repeatedly as a child – I re-read most books by Enid Blyton and Roald Dahl a fair few times, and my mom became so fed up of my repeated borrowing of Milly-Molly-Mandy from the library that she bought me my own copy.

I’m a little surprised that there are so few books published in the last decade or so on the list. I personally haven’t read many books in that time period aimed at the 6-8 year old reader, but my Beaver Scouts all bring exciting looking books with them to sleepovers so I’m aware they exist – I think I’d better start borrowing some of them so I can judge them myself.

Are there any books you’d have expected to see on this list?

Book Awards · Book News

Booktrust’s 100 Best Books: 0-5 year olds.

Today I’m going to look at the 25 books for 0-5 year olds selected by Booktrust for their list of 100 books every child should read before they’re 14.

Here is the list in full, I’ve bolded all of the books I’ve read.

EachPeachPearPlumEach Peach Pear Plum by Janet and Allan Ahlberg
The Jolly Postman or Other People’s Letters by Janet and Allan Ahlberg
The Snowman by Raymond Briggs
Gorilla by Anthony Browne
– Would You Rather? by John Burningham
Dear Zoo by Rod Campbell
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
IWillNotEverNeverI Will Not Ever Never Eat a Tomato by Lauren Child
– Princess Smartypants by Babette Cole
– Hairy Maclary from Donaldson’s Dairy by Lynley Dodd
Room on the Broom by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler
– Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes by Mem Fox and Helen Oxenbury
– Little Mouse’s Big Book of Fears by Emily Gravett
Where’s Spot by Eric Hill
Dogger by Shirley Hughes
– Lost and Found by Oliver Jeffers
The Tiger Who Came to Tea by Judith Kerr
I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen
– Not Now, Bernard by David McKee
MegAndMogMeg and Mog by Helen McNicholl and Jan Pienkowski
We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen and Helen Oxenbury
I Want My Potty! by Tony Ross
Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak
The Cat in the Hat by Dr Seuss
– The Elephant and the Bad Boy by Elfrida Vipont and Raymond Briggs

I’ve read 17 out of the 25, which is actually a few more than I’d expected. I think this reflects the relatively broad nature of the list – there are plenty of books here that were around when I was younger so I either read them as a young child myself, or to younger family friends. Of the books I haven’t read I had heard of most of them, I just haven’t come across them on one of my visits to the picture book section of the local library.

What do you think of the list? Are there any surprise inclusions or omissions?

Book Awards · Book News

Booktrust’s 100 Best Books.

BooktrustLogo
Today sees the start of Children’s Book Week 2013, the annual celebration of reading for pleasure for children. Booktrust have really kicked off the week well, they’ve announced their ultimate list of 100 books every child should read before they’re 14. They have split the books into four sections of 25 books, these are aimed at the age bands 0-5 years, 6-8 years, 9-11 years and 12-14 years.

This post about how they narrowed the list to 100 books is very interesting, and well worth reading. It puts the selection process into context and rightfully acknowledges that such a process is always a subjective one and any list is never going to garner universal agreement.

Booktrust are opening the debate to everyone, they’re inviting everyone to vote for their favourite book from the list for each of the four age bands. Voting closes on 15th November and they will announce “the nation’s top books” on 25th November.

For the rest of the week I’m going to focus on this list of 100 books. I will feature one section a day, listing the books in the section and my thoughts about them.

Book Stuff · Geek Stuff · TV Stuff

Lost in Space.

I’ve been trying to blog for over a week now, I went last Saturday to see The Effect at the National Theatre and it was just so good that every time I try to blog about it I get completely and utterly stuck. So I’m going to put that off until at least tomorrow and instead ask you lovely people a question.

I’m going to Starfury’s Serenity Forever convention in September, a 10th anniversary celebration of Firefly and Battlestar Galactica. I really love both shows so am looking forward to the convention, and am getting myself organised to rewatch both series over the next few months. I had this gorgeous book

IMG_0903

as a birthday present, it’s over 500 pages of scripts and facts and stories, so that will add lots to my preparation.

It’s left me thinking though about the fiction I read. I can’t remember the last book I read that was set in space, and this is something I want to change. This is where you come in – I’d love recommendations of books set in space, whether wholly or partly set on spaceships, it doesn’t matter whether they’re new books or classics, MG (aimed at 8 – 12 year olds), YA or adult, I just want to pull together a list of books I can read and enjoy. So please leave me a comment with your suggestion.

Book Meme

Top Ten Tuesday : Top Ten Settings I’d Like To See More Of (Or At All).

Top Ten Tuesday is a feature created by The Broke and the Bookish so that bloggers can share lists of bookish things.

TTT3W

I love this week’s topic for this week – settings for books I’d like to see more of. It’s been really fun to think of places I want to see more books set.

  1. Wales – my first choice has to be Wales. Whilst I’m temporarily not living there at the moment I still very much think of Wales as being my adopted home, it’s the place I can’t wait to move back to and the place I hope I get to live for many years. I wish it got used more as a setting for books, there are so many wonderful places that could be used so this is definitely my top choice.
  2. Rural UK – I’ve read some books that have more rural settings but I’d love to see more, having grown up in the countryside I always enjoy books set there.
  3. Spaceships – thinking slightly more broadly I’d love to see more YA set on spaceships, TV shows like Battlestar Galactica and Firefly are firm favourites so I’d love to see this.
  4. Different parts of the USA – I love reading books in the USA and I especially love books that are set somewhere a bit different. Don’t get me wrong, I especially love books set in New York City, but when I read books set in less popular states they really excite me.
  5. Patagonia – I hadn’t really heard of Patagonia until I moved to Wales but it sounds like a pretty interesting place, I really enjoyed actor Matthew Rhys’ Patagonia: Crossing the Plain about his journey on an expedition across Patagonia and would love to see fiction set there.
  6. Tropical Islands – Sun… sea… sand… sounds like the perfect setting for a lovely contemporary read.
  7. Tall Ships – I think the first book I read that was set on a tall ship was The Voyage of the Dawn Treader and a friend put me on to Patrick O’Brian’s Aubrey-Maturin series. I haven’t read anything set on a tall ship recently, I think there are plenty of stories that could be told.
  8. Boarding School – I grew up loving the Mallory Towers and St Clare’s books by Enid Blyton and the Chalet School books by Elinor M Brent-Dyer so for more there can never be too many books set in boarding schools.
  9. University – this one’s linked to number 8 I suppose, I feel like I’ve read so so many books set at school but very few set at university, particularly at a British university. Maybe as the New Adult craze settles this will be something that becomes a bit more commonplace, I’d certainly like to see it.
  10. Planets from Outer Space – I know I already said spaceships, but I’d also like to read more books set on far flung, preferably imaginary, planets. Aliens, other ways of life, lots of adventures… yes please!

That’s my list. I’m sure there are books out there that have some of these settings that I’m just not aware of. If you have a favourite book set in one of these pleases do please leave a comment so I can add it to my reading list.

Book Meme

Top Ten Tuesday: 2013 Debuts I’m Looking Forward To.

Top Ten Tuesday is a feature created by The Broke and the Bookish so that bloggers can share lists of bookish things.

TTT3W

Debuts is the topic for this week’s Top Ten Tuesday. I love this idea for a top ten as it’s made me go and have a look to see what debuts different publishers have, I’ve stuck to books being published in the UK and aimed at children and teens. I’ve sorted my list by publication date, like always images and synopses come from Goodreads or the publisher’s website.

SplinteredSplintered by A.G. Howard. Published 1st January by A & C Kids.
This stunning debut captures the grotesque madness of a mystical under-land, as well as a girl’s pangs of first love and independence. Alyssa Gardner hears the whispers of bugs and flowers—precisely the affliction that landed her mother in a mental hospital years before. This family curse stretches back to her ancestor Alice Liddell, the real-life inspiration for Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Alyssa might be crazy, but she manages to keep it together. For now.

When her mother’s mental health takes a turn for the worse, Alyssa learns that what she thought was fiction is based in terrifying reality. The real Wonderland is a place far darker and more twisted than Lewis Carroll ever let on. There, Alyssa must pass a series of tests, including draining an ocean of Alice’s tears, waking the slumbering tea party, and subduing a vicious bandersnatch, to fix Alice’s mistakes and save her family. She must also decide whom to trust: Jeb, her gorgeous best friend and secret crush, or the sexy but suspicious Morpheus, her guide through Wonderland, who may have dark motives of his own.

SorrowlineSorrowline by Niel Bushnell. Published 3rd January by Andersen Press.
The past is not a frozen place. Graveyards are not dead ends. And if the Sorrowline lets you in there is a hidden world of adventure waiting behind every gravestone.

Just when 12-year-old Jack Morrow’s life is falling apart he discovers his natural ability to travel through Sorrowlines: channels that connect every gravestone with the date of the person’s death. Confused and alone Jack finds himself in 1940. He embarks on an adventure through London during the Blitz with Davy, his teenage grandfather, to find a mystical Rose that might just save his mother’s life, a mother who he has already seen die. But the terrible power of the Rose of Annwn, is sought by many, and the forces of a secret world are determined to find it first. With a league of Undead Knights of his trail, commanded by the immortal Rouland, can Jack decipher the dark secret hidden at the heart of his family? Can he change his own destiny and save his mother?

TragedyPaperThe Tragedy Paper by Elizabeth LaBan. Published 10th January by Random House Children’s.
Tim Macbeth is a 17-year-old albino and a recent transfer to the prestigious Irving School, where the motto is, “Enter here to be and find a friend.” Tim does not expect to find a friend; all he really wants to do is escape his senior year unnoticed. Despite his efforts to blend into the background, he finds himself falling for the quintessential “it” girl, Vanessa Sheller, girlfriend of Irving’s most popular boy. To Tim’s surprise, Vanessa is into him, too, and she can kiss her social status goodbye if anyone finds out. Tim and Vanessa enter into a clandestine relationship, but looming over them is the Tragedy Paper, Irving’s version of a senior year thesis, assigned by the school’s least forgiving teacher.

The story unfolds from two alternating viewpoints: Tim, the tragic, love-struck figure, and Duncan, a current senior, who uncovers the truth behind Tim and Vanessa’s story and will consequently produce the greatest Tragedy Paper in Irving’s history.

PantomimePantomime by Laura Lam. Published 7th February by Strange Chemistry.
R.H. Ragona’s Circus of Magic is the greatest circus of Ellada. Nestled among the glowing blue Penglass – remnants of a mysterious civilisation long gone – are wonders beyond the wildest imagination. It’s a place where anything seems possible, where if you close your eyes you can believe that the magic and knowledge of the vanished Chimeras is still there. It’s a place where anyone can hide.

Iphigenia Laurus, or Gene, the daughter of a noble family, is uncomfortable in corsets and crinoline, and prefers climbing trees to debutante balls. Micah Grey, a runaway living on the streets, joins the circus as an aerialist’s apprentice and soon becomes the circus’s rising star. But Gene and Micah have balancing acts of their own to perform, and a secret in their blood that could unlock the mysteries of Ellada.

InfiniteSkyInfinite Sky by C.J. Flood. Published 14 February by Simon & Schuster.
Iris Dancy’s free-spirited mum has left for Tunisia, her dad’s rarely sober and her brother’s determined to fight anyone with a pair of fists.

When a family of travellers move into the overgrown paddock overnight, her dad looks set to finally lose it. Gypsies are parasites he says, but Iris is intrigued. As her dad plans to evict the travelling family, Iris makes friends with their teenage son. Trick Deran is a bare knuckle boxer who says he’s done with fighting, but is he telling the truth?

When tools go missing from the shed, the travellers are the first suspects. Iris’s brother, Sam, warns her to stay away from Trick; he’s dangerous, but Iris can no longer blindly follow her brother’s advice. He’s got secrets of his own, and she’s not sure he can be trusted himself.

Infinite Sky is a family story about betrayal and loyalty, and love.

ZombieGoldfishMy Big Fat Zombie Goldfish by Mo O’Hara. Published 28th February by Macmillan Children’s Books.
‘Sami was still holding the goldfish. “Swishy little fishy,” she whispered, over and over. Frankie stared at her with his big, bulging, glowing eyes. Suddenly a little light bulb went on . . . Frankie was a Big Fat Zombie Goldfish and somehow he’d hypnotized my best friend’s sister!’ Tom’s big brother is an Evil Scientist who wants to experiment on Tom’s new goldfish, Frankie. Can Tom save his fish from being dunked in radioactive gunge? Er, no. In an act of desperation Tom zaps Frankie with a battery, bringing him back to life! But there’s something weird about the new Frankie – he’s now a zombie goldfish with hypnotic powers, and he wants revenge . . . Tom has a difficult choice to make – save his evil brother, or save his fishy friend?

AcidACID by Emma Pass. Published 25th April by Corgi Children’s / Random House Children’s.
ACID – the most brutal police force in history.
They rule with an iron fist.
They see everything. They know everything.
They locked me away for life.

My crime?
They say I murdered my parents.
I was fifteen years old.

My name is Jenna Strong.

IfYouFindMeIf You Find Me by Emily Murdoch. Published 2nd May by Indigo.
A broken-down camper hidden deep in a national forest is the only home fifteen-year-old Carey can remember. The trees keep guard over her threadbare existence, with the one bright spot being Carey’s younger sister, Jenessa, who depends on Carey for her very survival. All they have is each other, as their mentally ill mother comes and goes with greater frequency. Until that one fateful day their mother disappears for good, and the girls are found by their father, a stranger, and taken to re-enter the “normal” life of school, clothes and boys.

Now, Carey must come to terms with the truth of why their mother spirited them away ten years ago, while haunted by a past that won’t let her go … a dark past that hides many a secret, including the reason Jenessa hasn’t spoken a word in over a year. Carey knows she must keep her sister close, and her secrets even closer, or risk watching her new life come crashing down.

Zenn Scarlett by Christian Schoon. Published 7th May by Strange Chemistry.
Zenn Scarlett is a bright, determined, occasionally a-little-too-smart-for-her-own-good 17-year-old girl training hard to become an exoveterinarian. That means she’s specializing in the treatment of exotic alien life forms, mostly large and generally dangerous. Her novice year of training at the Ciscan Cloister Exovet Clinic on Mars will find her working with alien patients from whalehounds the size of a hay barn to a baby Kiran Sunkiller, a colossal floating creature that will grow up to carry a whole sky-city on its back.

But after a series of inexplicable animal escapes from the school and other near-disasters, the Cloister is in real danger of being shut down by a group of alien-hating officials. If that happens, Zenn knows only too well the grim fate awaiting the creatures she loves.

Now, she must unravel the baffling events plaguing her school, before someone is hurt or killed, before everything she cares about is ripped away from her and her family forever. To solve this mystery – and live to tell about it – Zenn will have to put her new exovet skills to work in ways she never imagined, and in the process learn just how powerful compassion and empathy can be.

Taste Test by Kelly Fiore. Published 20th August by Bloomsbury USA.
If you can grill it, smoke it, or fry it, Nora Henderson knows all about it. Her father owns one of North Carolina’s most successful barbeque joints and she’s been shredding pork and basting baby back ribs since she could reach the counter. When Taste Test, a reality cooking show for teens, accepts her for their fifth season, it’s a chance for Nora to get out of her humble hometown and break into the big leagues of the culinary world. When she shows up on set at the North American Culinary Academy, however, it’s not just the New England weather that’s ice cold. Fights with her high-society roommate and run-ins with the son of a famous chef force Nora to work even harder to prove she’s a force to be reckoned with. But, despite winning challenges and falling for a fellow contestant, Nora can’t ignore the mysterious accidents that are plaguing the kitchen arena. It seems like someone is conducting eliminations of their own and Nora’s determined to get to the bottom of the mystery before she, or anyone else, is “86ed” for good.

Book Meme

Top Ten Tuesday: Bookish Goals for 2013.

Top Ten Tuesday is a feature created by The Broke and the Bookish so that bloggers can share lists of bookish things.

TTT3W

This year I’ve decided to take part in Top Ten Tuesday as often as I can. There are lots of book related memes and this is the one that I find most interesting when I see it on other blogs so thought it was time I took part. This week the focus is on bookish goals, I’ve already set a few reading goals in my review of the books I read in 2012, so here’s the list expanded to 10.

  1. Read 180 books – I read 163 last year so thought I’d try and increase my target a little.
  2. Read more books by authors who aren’t from the UK or USA – I made a conscious effort to read more books by British authors last year and ended up with 93% of the books being written by authors from the UK or USA so this year I wanted to increase the numbers of books by authors from different countries too.
  3. Read more picture books – when it was time this year to nominate books for the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal I realised this was an area I still didn’t know much about, I read all of the picture books discussed at the Wales Youth Library Group nominations day and loved them so this year I plan to read more. I think I might do a monthly post about the picture books I’ve read.
  4. Read more graphic novels – I love graphic novels and comics but am really bad at prioritising them to read, I’m having some new bookcases in a few weeks and I’ll be able to have my graphic novels in the same place as my books at last.
  5. Read at least one non-fiction book each month – last year I pledged to do this and managed it for about 4 months. I have some great non-fiction books on my shelves waiting to be read so this year I’m determined to make it last all year.
  6. Be better at giving up – I’m trying to be better about giving up on books I’m not enjoying but it is still really hard, last year I only had two books that I didn’t finished but there are a few I really should have given up on.
  7. Read the CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medal shortlists – last year I shadowed the Carnegie shortlist and thoroughly enjoyed the experience, this year I want to shadow both shortlists.
  8. Use the library more – I’m going to use the library more this year to work through books on my wishlist, it’s good for libraries and good for my pocket.
  9. Talk about books more – I’m going to try and talk more about books with more people, there are some people I talk about books with all the time so I’m going to try and do this more often.
  10. Keep up with reviews – this year I want to be really organised and keep my blog up to date with reviews rather than getting into a situation where I have a towering pile of books waiting to be reviewed.

Do you have any bookish goals for 2013?

Book Stuff · Films · TV Stuff

My 2012 Favourites.

I thought this year instead of doing seperate best of 2012 list posts I’d do one consolidated post – my favourite books that I’ve read, films and tv shows I’ve watched this year. Each list is in no particular order, I’m afraid I’m not prepared to spend the next week arguing with myself about ranking the list entries! It’s been a pretty wonderful year for all of these things, there were so many that nearly made the list but had to give way for something I simply couldn’t omit.

My Books of 2012.

1. A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

2. Heart Shaped Bruise by Tanya Byrne

3. Hollow Pike by James Dawson

Books1
4. The Iron Druid Chronicles by Kevin Hearne (Hounded, Hexed and Hammered)

5. Department 19 and Department 19: The Rising by Will Hill

6. Kiss, Date, Love, Hate by Luisa Plaja

7. Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

Books2
8. Saving June by Hannah Harrington

9. Catching Jordan by Miranda Kenneally

10. The Fault In Our Stars by John Green

My Films of 2012.

1. Avengers Assemble

2. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

3. Dark Knight Rises

Films1
4. The Pirates! In An Adventure With Scientists

5. Magic Mike

6. Lawless

7. Premium Rush

Films2
8. 21 Jump Street
9. Looper
10. The Intouchables

My TV Shows of 2012.

1. The Walking Dead

2. Doctor Who

3. Sons of Anarchy

TV1

4. Leverage

5. Chicago Fire

6. Merlin

7. Southland

TV2

8. Sherlock

9. Castle

10. Elementary

What were your favourites this year?